Gallican Priest Ordained

His Most Excellent Reverence Monsignor Rodrigues, Archbishop of Lyons and Primate of the Gallican Rite ordains a new priest for the Holy Church.


Mar Ignatius Peter III, Patriarch of Antioch - Predecessor of the Catholicate

Mar Ignatius Peter III, Patriarch of Antioch

Mar Ignatius Peter III, Patriarch of Antioch served as the head of the Syriac Orthodox Church between 1872 and 1894. Born in Mosul to a well-known Christian family, many consider him to be the father of the modern church. 

He was a priest at the Monastery of Mor Hananyo and was consecrated Metropolitan Archbishop of Damascus in 1846, taking the name Julius. 

After the death of Patriarch Ignatius Jacob II, Ignatius Peter was unanimously elected by the synod as patriarch. Although he declined the position at first, he was eventually persuaded to accept and was consecrated and enthroned as patriarch 16 June 1872. At that point he took the Patriarchal name Ignatius.

Among his many accomplishments as Patriarch was the improvement of the Malankara Syrian Church in India, which involved diplomatic efforts in Britain and meeting with Queen Victoria. In Constantinople, he established a new church dedicated to the Blessed Virgin. 

He is buried at Beth Qadishe.

Pope Saint Pius IX - Predecessor of the Catholicate

Pope Saint Pius IX

Pope Saint Pius IX was born Giovanni Maria Mastai Ferretti in 1792. He reigned as Bishop of Rome from 1846 to 1878. This constitutes the longest known papal reign. He defined the dogma of the Immaculate Conception in 1854, which simply stated a long-held belief that the Blessed Virgin Mary Theotokos was conceived without original sin. He also formalised the dogma of the long-held belief in papal infallibility. In 1870, he permanently lost direct/de facto reign over the Stato Pontificio to the conquering Kingdom of Italy. Pope St. John Paul II beatified him in 2000, and the Florentine-Roman Papa Rutherford I canonised him in 2021. 




Coat of Arms of H.H.E. the Papa-Catholicos


 


National Anthem of the Pontifical Roman State and Imperial Roman Church


 


Antonio Cardinal Barberini, Archbishop of Reims - Predecessor of the Catholicate

 

Antonio Cardinal Barberini

Antonio Cardinal Barberini was Archbishop of Reims (which had the right to crown the Kings of France) and also a military leader and patron of the arts. As both a Cardinal-nephew of Pope Urban VIII and a member of the elite of France, he was in a highly privileged position to shape politics and history. 

Sergei, Patriarch of Moscow and All Rus' - Predecessor of the Catholicate

 

Sergei, Patriarch of Moscow and All Rus'

Patriarch Sergei (Ivan Nikolayevich Stragorodsky) served as 12th Patriarch of Moscow and All Rus', 1943-1944. He had previously served as Bishop of Jamburg, Cicar of the St. Peterburg diocese, Archbishop of Vyborg and all Finland, and Metropolitan of Nizhny Novgorod. Grigori Rasputin contacted him as one of the first in the capital. He was arrest by the Bolsheviks in January 1921; being exiled after several months in jail to Nizhny-Novgorod. 


Metropolitan Macarius of Moscow - Predecessor of the Catholicate

Metropolitan Macarius

Macarius took monastic vows in 1861, being ordained a hieromonk (monastic priest). In 1883, he was consecrated as Bishop of Biysk, being later appointed Bishop of Tomsk and Semipalatinsk in 1891. He also later served as Bishop and Archbishop of Tomsk and Barnaul, and Archbishop of Tomsk and Altay. In 1912, he was elected by the Holy Synod as Metropolitan of Moscow and Kolomna. 




Metropolitan Evdokim, Archbishop of the Aleutians and North America, Archbishop of Nizhny-Novgorod - Predecessor of the Catholicate

Metropolitan Evdokim, Archbishop of the Aleutians and North America, Archbishop of Nizhny Novgorod

Metropolitan Evdokim (Basil Mikhailovich Meschersky) was born 1 April 1869 in Kaznevo, Vladimir Governorate, Russian Empire. After seminary and service as a priest, he was consecrated in 1904 as a Bishop in the Dormition Cathedral in the Moscow Kremlin by Metropolitan Vladimir of Moscow and Kolomna, assisted by Archbishop Sergius of Yaroslavl and Rostov, and various other bishops. 



He served as Vicar-Bishop of Volokolamsk in the Moscow Diocesp, where he published a journal on Christianising society entitled “The Christian.” He also served as rector of Moscow Theological Academy. 


Later he was appointed as Bishop of Kashira, Vicar-Bishop of the Tula and Belev Diocese, as well as Rector of the Shcheglovsky Monastery of the Mammal Icon of the Mother of God. Just before the commencement of the Great War in 1914, he was elevated to the rank and dignity of archbishop and transferred to North America. There he was assigned to the Diocese of the Aleutian Islands and North America as its archbishop. There he was very active in organisation and re-organisation of religious institutions in America. Then in 1917 he was called to participate in the All-Russian Local Council. Due to the Russian Civil War, he could not return to North America. He became Archbishop of Nizhny-Novgorod. He joined the movement that opposed Soviet control of the Church.  

Pope Saint Leo X - Predecessor of the Catholicate

Pope Saint Leo X

Pope Saint Leo X (Giovanni di Lorenzo de' Medici) was Bishop of Rome from 1513 to 1521. Of the powerful and prominent Medici family of Florence, St. Leo was the second son of the famed Lorenzo de' Medici, Lord of Florence. The Papa-Catholicos is his temporal and spiritual successor as Florentine Archfather. 

St. Leo became a cardinal in 1489 and was elected Pope following St. Julius II. He oversaw the end of the Fifth Lateran Council and issued the Papal bull Exsurge Domine  against Martin Luther and the budding Protestant Reformation. 

The construction of the new St. Peter's Basilica continued significantly under his pontificate. Like his father, he was a great patron of the arts. One important example is the Raphael Rooms in the Vatican, which constitute the official titular residence of the Florentine-Roman Papa within the Vatican (the Quirinale being the principle Roman palace of the Stato Pontificio). He is buried in Santa Maria sopra la Minerva, in Rome. 

Mar Yohannan Hormizd, Syrian Patriarch of Babylon of the Chaldeans, Chaldean Catholic Church - Predecessor of the Catholicate

Mar Yohannan Hormizd

Mar Yohannan VIII Hormizd, of the Eliya line, served as the last hereditary Patriarch of the Church of the East and the first Patriarch of the United Chaldean Church. He followed in the footsteps of his uncle Eliya XI, becoming patriarch in 1778 and being recognised by the Vatican. After his death in 1838, his successor Nicholas I Zay'a was appointed by the Vatican. Thus ended the centuries-old custom of hereditary succession.




Mar Joseph Audo, Syrian Patriarch of Babylon of the Chaldeans, Chaldean Catholic Church - Predecessor of the Catholicate

Mar Joseph Audo, Syrian
Patriarch of Babylon of the Chaldeans,
Chaldean Catholic Church

In 1847, Mar Joseph Audo was elected Patriarch of the Chaldean Catholic Church, receiving confirmation from Pope St. Pius IX in 1848. He strove to improve the Chaldean clergy and their evangelical, missionary efforts. The church indeed flourished under his leadership. 




Mar Yousef VI Emmanuel II, Patriarch of Babylon - Predecessor of the Catholicate

Mar Yousef VI Emmanuel II

Mar Yousef VI Emmanuel II Thomas served as Patriarch of the Chaldean Catholic Church 1900-1947. Born 8 August 1852 in Alqosh, he was consecrated Bishop of Seert in modern-day Turkey 1892, having been ordained priest in 1879. Earlier he studied in the Ghazir Seminary, located in Lebanon. He became Patriarch in 1900, confirmed by the Holy See of Rome. 



Saint Mar Julius, Metropolitan of Goa - Predecessor of the Catholicate

Saint Mar Julius, Metropolitan of Goa

Mar Julius (Antonio Francisco Xavier Alvares) was originally Roman Catholic and joined the Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church. As a cleric, in time he was consecrated Metropolitan of Goa, Ceylon, and Greater India. He was an educator, social worker, and dispenser of charity. He was canonised by the Syrian Church. His remains are located at St. Mary's Church in Ribandar. His feast is celebrated on 23 September.



Patriarch Nikon of Moscow and All Rus' - Predecessor of the Catholicate

Patriarch Nikon of Moscow and All Rus'

Nikon served as Patriarch of Moscow and All Rus' of the Russian Orthodox Church between 1652 to 1666. A close friend and ally of Tsar Alexei of Russia, he carried out many reforms and exercised  at times considerable political power. It was even said sometimes his political power was equal or greater than that of the Tsar.